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Treenworks

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My Pole Lathe (Part 5)

This post covers installing the bungee (replaces the pole) and making a treadle.  Please make sure you read the previous posts in this series. Part 1 Part 2  Part 3 Part 4 Congratulations on making it this far, we are in the home stretch. I installed 2 eye hooks about 4 inches down from the top of the posts in the center board.  The size of the eye hook should be determined by your bungee.  Mine are inch and a half.  I pre drilled the holes just an 1/8th of an inch smaller than the

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

My Pole Lathe (Part 4)

This post covers centers and a tool rest.  Please make sure you read the previous posts in this series. Part 1 Part 2  Part 3 There are plenty of people that will tell you that centers are easy to make.  I am sure they are right.  I like wood, my garage is covered in combustible material, and I really do not want to learn right now.  There are a few people in the US and UK that can outfit you with centers, mandrels, and hooks.  You may need to wait, but anyone that wants to buy a h

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

My Pole Lathe (Part 3)

This post covers making the poppets. Please make sure you read the previous posts in this series. Part 1 Part 2 Let’s make some poppets.  You may be surprised, but we are going to make another sandwich.  This time the center piece will be longer than the outside pieces.  This will create a tenon that fits into the mortise in the cross member.  The most important part of the poppet is that the two outside pieces that ride against the cross member create a shoulder for the l

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

My Pole Lathe (Part 2)

This post covers making the cross member that the the poppets will sit on. Please make sure you read the previous post in this series.    On to the cross member.  You will need two 48 inch pieces and two 10 inch pieces of 2 x 8 and a few scrap spacers.  I chose 48 inches for the span of my cross member because it would accommodate any size bowl I could imagine and because I could get the two 48 inch pieces from one 2 x 8.  If you want to have a smaller span, do it.  We are going to make

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

My Pole Lathe (Part 1)

I wanted to build a pole lathe made from a large, heavy slab of oak, all of the legs and posts riven and hewn, with poppets that look like they grew that way, and a long sapling to provide the spring in my spring pole lathe.  (Can you hear the birds chirping in the background and see a bucolic forest scene with dappled sunlight?) But I live in suburban Philadelphia, and sourcing wood for my greenwood craft is a challenge in itself.  Luckily enough I came across some posts on Instagram from Nate

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

4 Little Bowls

Like many of my projects, this was inspired by David Fisher.  I’ve had the good fortune to take a class with David.  He is a Master Bowl Carver, and one of the nicest, most patient, and humble people I have ever had the good fortune to meet.  If you aren’t following his blog I would encourage you to do so.  He has a number of blog posts regarding making smaller bowls.  As using an adze is much easier on a larger piece of wood, he hollows out multiple bowls from one piece and then separates them

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

Quaich

According to Wikipedia a Quaich, quaigh, or quoich, is a special kind of shallow two-handled drinking cup or bowl in Scotland. It derives from the Scottish gaelic cuach meaning a cup. If you continue to follow this blog, you will learn over time that I will take liberties based on the wood I have, the skills I want to develop, and any random thought that might move through my mind at the time.  I think some call this creative license.  I’m comfortable with that.  Additionally my ancestors are f

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

My Sloyd Horse (Part 3 the Shave Horse)

This post is the third of  a three part series on what I have “humbly” deemed my sloyd horse.  You may want to read the first post on the Spoon Mule, and the second post on the Bowl Horse as I won’t be repeating much of the information found in those posts.  Additionally, they are also fascinating and very well written.  I use italics to denote sarcasm or hyperbole. I have to be honest, I built the shave horse because I had the plans and it just seemed like I had to build one.  In my mind, it i

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

My Sloyd Horse (Part 2 the Bowl Horse)

This post is the second of three part series on what I have “humbly” deemed my sloyd horse.  You may want to read the first post on the Spoon Mule as I won’t be repeating much of the information found in that post. I enjoy carving bowls.  That is a bit of an understatement.  If I had an unlimited supply of wood, time, and money, I’d spend most of every day carving bowls.  But I find some aspects of bowl carving to be a real pain in my back.  At certain points I need to clamp the bowl to work on

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

My Sloyd Horse (Part 1 the Spoon Mule)

I have often found myself admiring the different clamping devices I see for spoons, bowls, and anything that can be shaped with a draw knife.  Dawson of Michigan Sloyd sells plans for a Spoon Mule.  Tim Manney sells plans for a Shave Horse.  Dave Fisher has published drawings of his Bowl Horse.   Sean Hellman published a great book that shows just about every type of woodland vice you can imagine.  With all of this input deciding what to do can be a project in itself.  I recently read somewhere

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

The Twisted Bowl

I enjoy making spoons and bowls that are functional, and let the wood decide a good deal of the finished form.  I enjoy finding the grain, and maintaining as many of those long fibers as possible.  So if I’m making a long bowl, and the log has a twist, it is going to show up in the final form.  There are a number of philosophical names and schools of design that may help you understand this concept, I refer to it as “because that is the way the tree grew”. I had a 31” piece of sugar maple w

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

A fortuitous mistake

If you have read any of my posts on bowls, you will notice that there is a regular reference to David Fisher.  This one is no different in the fact that I once again reference techniques that he has shared.  Between his articles in Fine Wood Working magazine, his blog posts, and the information on his website, he has shared more than enough information for anyone to pick up a log, axe, adze, and any other sharp piece of steel and make not only a functional bowl, but something far more sculpted t

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

Chasing knowledge, and a good time

I can make a spoon out of wood.  It may not be the most aesthetically pleasing spoon, but it transfers food and liquid from a cup or bowl in my mouth and I don’t have any splinters on my tongue.  Fairly low bar, but everyone needs to start somewhere, and it has taken me a while to get to this stage.   Click to view slideshow. Like most novice green woodworkers, I have spent hours watching YouTube.  ZedOutdoors has been particularly good at promoting UK greenwood carvers including Lee Stoffer,

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

I wouldn’t suggest it, but I have plenty of carving wood.

The two most dominant trees on my property were a weeping cherry and a sugar maple.  Both of these were important as the weeping cherry was planted soon after we moved into the home over 20 years ago, and while the sugar maple was already planted when we moved in, each fall we were visited by many of our neighbors to collect it’s beautiful orange leaves.  Unfortunately both trees developed root issues and were beginning to fail.  My son and I were able to take down the weeping cherry with a prun

Phoenix

Phoenix

 

Finishing my greenwood carvings, bowls or spoons

Once I’ve completed the greenwood carving, either a bowl or spoon, I let it sit in a controlled environment for drying.  Around here that is a large lidded cardboard box in my basement.  The basement has a dehumidifier, so even in the summer the humidity level isn’t likely to fluctuate too much.  The same is true for the temperature, or at least it has the minimal temperature fluctuations available to me.  For spoons, I can tell if they are ready for final cuts by feel and sound.  To date, this

Phoenix

Phoenix

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