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Tire Deflators - Who Has what and Why?

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Speaking of Rocks..let's talk about Airing Down.  If you have been to Rausch Creek, or a similar off road park, you know that airing down your tires is necessary for many reasons. Most of which is to give you better traction and the ability to go up, over and around some obstacles that you normally wouldn't be able to at full air PSI.  there are several ways to air down, but easiest of all is to use a 'Tire deflator' that enables you to air down to a specific air pressure, usually between 10-15 psi, without worrying about going too low, and losing a bead.  Below, are a few of the most popular deflators that we have seen or used..give us your thoughts on what you use and why.  Also, what pressure do you run, and what terrain?

 

Trailhead Tire Deflators (Set of 4)

 

Staun Tire Deflators (Set of 4)

 

Currie EZ-Tire Deflator

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I have the trailhead deflators.  Like anything that is going to save you time, you need to spend some time setting these up to function correctly.  Once you set them up, they're great. 

 

Setting them up requires an hour, a cold drink, a cigar, an air compressor, an air pressure gauge, and some patience.  You may need more cold drinks, and cigars depending on how quick you drink or smoke.  Depending on how much you drink, you may need more time.

 

You adjust how low they'll go with an allen wrench that comes with the deflators.  I cranked mine down half way and started there.  I continued to adjust each till I got between 13 and 17 consistently. 

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I use the Currie deflator because my air pressure depends on the terrain I'm going to run. Most of the time I just go down to 10-12 psi. If we are going to get into technical stuff single digits are where it's at so I'll go down to 5-6psi.

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Stauns here. Rolled up to the beach yesterday, popped the Stauns on and idled down the beach while everybody else was putzing around letting the air out of their tires, was nice. 

 

Usually air down to 12 psi for everything

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X2 on stauns. I usually keep them set around 14-16. So much easier to pull up to rausch, pop em all on and let em go to work. Seen too many guys stand at each tire letting out air and re checking pressure 20x til it's where they want it.

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Ever looking around for new and interesting gear, I got this little guy from Q-Tec.  It's already indexed, so you just pick the PSI, and there you go.  I'll write a review next time I'm at RC, as I've not used them yet.  Also, it's not small.  About the size of a roll of quarters.  The one I got goes from 2-12 PSI in increments of 2.  There's another one that goes from 10-20 in increments of 2.

 

 

 

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Rick, aren't those indexed deflators like around $80 each piece? 

 

I never had any luck getting my Staun's to give me a consistent pressure, even after spending hours trying to adjust them.  I use them to get me in the neighborhood then use an Viair inflator/deflator for the final adjustment, which might vary according to the terrain.  10-11 PSI is my normal pressure, but on slick rocks I've gone down to 8-9, but only for a short while.  Too worried about cutting a sidewall to stay that low on 35" BFG's.

 

Realistically, with some practice and experience, you don't need one of those automatic deflators.  I find that I can just go around and screw-in the deflators on all four wheels, then start my Flashpaq reprogramming, and then go back and take off the deflators and I'm right in the neighborhood of where I want to be.  So a cheap set of Teraflex tire deflators (around $15-20) can do the job.  But if you want fast and don't mind hunching-over your tires the entire time, the ARB and Curry deflators can't be beat (at least not without drilling extra holes in your wheel for oversize air valves).

 

I used to use a Psiclops, which is a double-headed air hose with a gauge.  This allowed me to adjust and balance two tires at the same time.  But the clip-on chucks got fubar'd and I haven't got around to finding replacements yet.  They seem to be discontinued now, but you can easily make one yourself with some air hose, clip-on chucks, air gauge and a y-adapter or manifold.

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Rick, aren't those indexed deflators like around $80 each piece? 

 

I never had any luck getting my Staun's to give me a consistent pressure, even after spending hours trying to adjust them.  I use them to get me in the neighborhood then use an Viair inflator/deflator for the final adjustment, which might vary according to the terrain.  10-11 PSI is my normal pressure, but on slick rocks I've gone down to 8-9, but only for a short while.  Too worried about cutting a sidewall to stay that low on 35" BFG's.

 

Realistically, with some practice and experience, you don't need one of those automatic deflators.  I find that I can just go around and screw-in the deflators on all four wheels, then start my Flashpaq reprogramming, and then go back and take off the deflators and I'm right in the neighborhood of where I want to be.  So a cheap set of Teraflex tire deflators (around $15-20) can do the job.  But if you want fast and don't mind hunching-over your tires the entire time, the ARB and Curry deflators can't be beat (at least not without drilling extra holes in your wheel for oversize air valves).

 

I used to use a Psiclops, which is a double-headed air hose with a gauge.  This allowed me to adjust and balance two tires at the same time.  But the clip-on chucks got fubar'd and I haven't got around to finding replacements yet.  They seem to be discontinued now, but you can easily make one yourself with some air hose, clip-on chucks, air gauge and a y-adapter or manifold.

 

Yep, that's the price, but I only have one of them.  I figured there's little difference between that and the ARB as far as one wheel at a time, except one is automatic and no crouch/hunch.  The ARB may be a little faster, but I've never been the last one to air down anyway.

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